IROS 35th Anniversary Forum

sponsored by RSJ and SICE
Oct. 25, 12:30-18:00@Main Hall

Objective

To highlight the contributions and celebrate the achievements and impacts of IROS’s past 35 years!

Committee

  • C.S. George Lee (Co-Chair)
  • Minoru Asada (Co-Chair)
  • Shugen Ma (Co-Chair; IROS 2022 General Chair)
  • Tamim Asfour (Germany)
  • Aude G. Billard (Switzerland)
  • Ayanna Howard (USA)
  • Cecilia Laschi (Singapore)
  • Christian Laugier (France)
  • Yunhui Liu (Hong Kong, China)
  • Junku Yuh (South Korea)
  • Yasushi Nakauchi (ex officio; IROS 2022 Program Chair)
  • Kazuhito Yokoi (ex officio; IROS 2022 Forum Chair)

Program Summary

12:30 – 12:45 – Opening Introduction

12:45 – 13:30 – Autonomous Systems,

Roland Siegwart

13:30 – 13:45 – Break

13:45 – 14:30 – Assistive and Social Robots,

Maja J Matarić

14:30 – 14:45 – Break

14:45 – 15:30 – Women in Robotics Engineering and Science (WiRES)

15:30 – 15:45 – Break

16:00 – 17:30 – Robot Research and Development (Plenary Session),

Shigeo Hirose and Marc Raibert

17:30 – 18:00 – IROS@35 Celebration Closing

Session 1: Autonomous Systems

 

Flying Robots – From basic flight capabilities to autonomous navigation and in-flight interactions

12:45-13:30 (45 minutes with Q&A included)

Roland Siegwart

Autonomous Systems Lab & Wyss Zurich

www.asl.ethz.ch & www.wysszurich.ch

Abstract:

In the last 20 years, flying robots have evolved from fascinating lab prototypes to extremely useful tools for aerial imaging, search and rescue, and inspections at height. However, the limited flight time and payload, as well as the restricted computing power of drones renders autonomous operations quite challenging. This talk will focus on the design and autonomous navigation of flying robots. Innovative designs of flying systems, from solar airplanes for continuous flights to hybrid concepts combining vertical take-off and landing with the efficiency of fixed-wing flight, and omni-directional and interactive multi-copters are presented. Recent results of visual and laser-based navigation (localization, mapping, planning) in GPS denied environments are showcased and discussed. Performance and potential applications are presented and discussed.

Bio:

Roland Siegwart (born in 1959) is professor for autonomous mobile robots at ETH Zurich, founding co-director of the Wyss Zurich accelerator and member of the board of directors of multiple high-tech companies. He studied mechanical engineering at ETH, spent ten years as professor at EPFL Lausanne (1996 – 2006), was vice president of ETH Zurich (2010 -2014) and held visiting positions at Stanford University and NASA Ames.

He is and was the coordinator of multiple European projects and co-founder over half a dozen spin-off companies, including Wingta, Anybotics, Sevensense and Voliro. He is IEEE Fellow, recipient of the IEEE RAS Inaba Technical Award, the IEEE RAS Pioneer award and officer of the International Federation of Robotics Research (IFRR). He is on the editorial board of multiple journals in robotics and was a general chair of several conferences in robotics including IROS 2002, AIM 2007, FSR 2007, ISRR 2009, FSR 2017 and CoRL 2018. His interests are in the design and navigation of flying, wheeled, walking and swimming robots operating in complex and highly dynamical environments. Since 20 years, his lab is pioneering the field of flying robots.

Christian Laugier

Bio:

Dr Christian LAUGIER is Research Director at Inria and responsible for R&D activities on Autonomous Vehicle within the Inria Chroma project-team (Grenoble & Lyon); he was previously Scientific Manager of the Inria eMotion project-team and Scientific Manager of the Inria cooperation program with the Asia & Oceania regions (Inria international affairs department). He was also during the previous decades Deputy Director of the LIFIA laboratory (IT & AI, ~200 persons) and Deputy Director of the LIG Laboratory (IT, ~500 persons) at the University of Grenoble. In addition, he was co-founder of the Probayes company and Scientific Advisor for Probayes (during 20 years) and for Baidu China for (during 2 years). He also made recognized scientific contributions and patented innovations shared with manufacturers such as Probayes, Toyota or Renault.

Dr Christian Laugier is IROS Fellow and IEEE Senior Member and he is the recipient of several IEEE and Conference Awards in the fields of Robotics and Intelligent Vehicles, such as the IROS Nakamura Award, the IROS Harashima Award, the IROS Distinguish Service Award, or the EU-Robotics Technology Transfer Award (finalist with Probayes). His current research interests are mainly in the field of Embedded Bayesian & AI driven Perception and Decision-making for autonomous robots and vehicles operating in complex uncertain and dynamic environments.

He has supervised some forty doctoral theses, he is the author or co-author of numerous referenced international publications and he has given numerous guest keynotes or plenary lectures in these scientific fields. He has also co-edited and/or contributed to the editing of several well-referenced Books & Handbooks in the fields of Robotics and Intelligent Vehicles.

Dr Christian Laugier is a member of several IEEE International Scientific Committees such the IROS, ARSO or T-IV steering committees; he is also a member of the Editorial Boards of several IEEE Scientific Journals such as Robomech or T-IV, and he is regularly involved in the Organizing Committees of the main IEEE conferences such as ICRA, IROS or IV. He is also a founding member and co-chair of the IEEE RAS Technical Committee on “Autonomous Ground Vehicles and Intelligent Transportation Systems”, which has been twice awarded and which regularly organize workshops attracting a growing number of participants within the framework of major conferences in the field (ICRA, IROS, IV).

An overview of recent research activities, publications and patents can be found at:  https://hal.inria.fr/hal-03147594

Roland Siegwart

Autonomous Systems Lab & Wyss Zurich

www.asl.ethz.ch & www.wysszurich.ch

Abstract:

In the last 20 years, flying robots have evolved from fascinating lab prototypes to extremely useful tools for aerial imaging, search and rescue, and inspections at height. However, the limited flight time and payload, as well as the restricted computing power of drones renders autonomous operations quite challenging. This talk will focus on the design and autonomous navigation of flying robots. Innovative designs of flying systems, from solar airplanes for continuous flights to hybrid concepts combining vertical take-off and landing with the efficiency of fixed-wing flight, and omni-directional and interactive multi-copters are presented. Recent results of visual and laser-based navigation (localization, mapping, planning) in GPS denied environments are showcased and discussed. Performance and potential applications are presented and discussed.

Bio:

Roland Siegwart (born in 1959) is professor for autonomous mobile robots at ETH Zurich, founding co-director of the Wyss Zurich accelerator and member of the board of directors of multiple high-tech companies. He studied mechanical engineering at ETH, spent ten years as professor at EPFL Lausanne (1996 – 2006), was vice president of ETH Zurich (2010 -2014) and held visiting positions at Stanford University and NASA Ames.

He is and was the coordinator of multiple European projects and co-founder over half a dozen spin-off companies, including Wingta, Anybotics, Sevensense and Voliro. He is IEEE Fellow, recipient of the IEEE RAS Inaba Technical Award, the IEEE RAS Pioneer award and officer of the International Federation of Robotics Research (IFRR). He is on the editorial board of multiple journals in robotics and was a general chair of several conferences in robotics including IROS 2002, AIM 2007, FSR 2007, ISRR 2009, FSR 2017 and CoRL 2018. His interests are in the design and navigation of flying, wheeled, walking and swimming robots operating in complex and highly dynamical environments. Since 20 years, his lab is pioneering the field of flying robots.

Christian Laugier

Bio:

Dr Christian LAUGIER is Research Director at Inria and responsible for R&D activities on Autonomous Vehicle within the Inria Chroma project-team (Grenoble & Lyon); he was previously Scientific Manager of the Inria eMotion project-team and Scientific Manager of the Inria cooperation program with the Asia & Oceania regions (Inria international affairs department). He was also during the previous decades Deputy Director of the LIFIA laboratory (IT & AI, ~200 persons) and Deputy Director of the LIG Laboratory (IT, ~500 persons) at the University of Grenoble. In addition, he was co-founder of the Probayes company and Scientific Advisor for Probayes (during 20 years) and for Baidu China for (during 2 years). He also made recognized scientific contributions and patented innovations shared with manufacturers such as Probayes, Toyota or Renault.

Dr Christian Laugier is IROS Fellow and IEEE Senior Member and he is the recipient of several IEEE and Conference Awards in the fields of Robotics and Intelligent Vehicles, such as the IROS Nakamura Award, the IROS Harashima Award, the IROS Distinguish Service Award, or the EU-Robotics Technology Transfer Award (finalist with Probayes). His current research interests are mainly in the field of Embedded Bayesian & AI driven Perception and Decision-making for autonomous robots and vehicles operating in complex uncertain and dynamic environments.

He has supervised some forty doctoral theses, he is the author or co-author of numerous referenced international publications and he has given numerous guest keynotes or plenary lectures in these scientific fields. He has also co-edited and/or contributed to the editing of several well-referenced Books & Handbooks in the fields of Robotics and Intelligent Vehicles.

Dr Christian Laugier is a member of several IEEE International Scientific Committees such the IROS, ARSO or T-IV steering committees; he is also a member of the Editorial Boards of several IEEE Scientific Journals such as Robomech or T-IV, and he is regularly involved in the Organizing Committees of the main IEEE conferences such as ICRA, IROS or IV. He is also a founding member and co-chair of the IEEE RAS Technical Committee on “Autonomous Ground Vehicles and Intelligent Transportation Systems”, which has been twice awarded and which regularly organize workshops attracting a growing number of participants within the framework of major conferences in the field (ICRA, IROS, IV).

An overview of recent research activities, publications and patents can be found at:  https://hal.inria.fr/hal-03147594

Session 2: Assistive and Social Robots

A Robot Just for You: Personalized Human-Robot Interaction and the Future of Work and Care

13:45-14:30 (45 minutes with Q&A included)

Maja J Matarić

University of Southern California

Los Angeles, California, USA

Abstract:

As robots become part of our world, we demand that they understand us, predict our needs and wants, and adapt to us as we change our moods and minds, learn, grow, and age. The nexus created by major improvements in machine learning for machine perception, navigation, and natural language processing has enabled human-robot interaction in real-world contexts, just as the need for human services continues to grow, from elder care to nursing to education and training, positively impacting user health and quality of life. We will discuss work that brings robotics together with machine learning for user modeling, signal processing, and affective computing in order to enable robots to understand, interact, and adapt to users’ ever-changing needs.  The talk will cover methods and challenges of using multi-modal interaction data and expressive agent behavior to monitor, coach, motivate, and support a wide variety of user populations and use cases.  We will cover insights from work with users across the age span (children, adults, elderly), ability span (typically developing, autism, stroke, Alzheimer’s), contexts (schools, therapy centers, homes), and deployment durations (up to 6 months), as well as commercial implications.

Bio:

Maja J Matarić is Chan Soon-Shiong Distinguished Professor of Computer Science, Neuroscience, and Pediatrics at the University of Southern California (USC) and the founding director of the USC Robotics and Autonomous Systems Center.  Her PhD and MS are from MIT, and her BS is from Kansas University.  She is Fellow of AAAS, IEEE, AAAI, and ACM, recipient of the US Presidential Award for Excellence in Science, Mathematics & Engineering Mentoring, Anita Borg Institute Women of Vision for Innovation, NSF Career, MIT TR35 Innovation, and IEEE RAS Early Career Awards, and authored “The Robotics Primer” (MIT Press).  Her university leadership includes serving as the Vice President of Research (2020-21) and as Engineering Vice Dean of Research (2006-2019).  She leads the Engineering K-12 STEM Center and actively mentors and empowers students, women, and other underrepresented groups toward pursuing STEM careers. A pioneer of the field of socially assistive robotics, her research is developing human-machine interaction for personalized support in convalescence, rehabilitation, training, and education for autism spectrum disorders, stroke, dementia, anxiety, and other major health and wellness challenges.

Aude G. Billard

Head of the LASA laboratory

Swiss Institute of Technology Lausanne (EPFL), Switzerland

Bio:

Aude Billard is full professor and head of the LASA laboratory at the School of Engineering at the Swiss Institute of Technology Lausanne (EPFL), and the Director of the Swiss National Theme Innovation Booster Network in Robotics.  She has been elected President of the IEEE Robotics and Automation Society, after serving in several roles in the administrative and executive committees of the society.  Dr. Billard holds a B.Sc and M.Sc. in Physics from EPFL (1995) and a Ph.D. in Artificial Intelligence (1998) from the University of Edinburgh.  Dr. Billard is an IEEE Fellow and was the recipient of the Intel Corporation Teaching award, the Swiss National Science Foundation career award, the Outstanding Young Person in Science and Innovation from the Swiss Chamber of Commerce, the IEEE RAS Distinguished Award and the IEEE-RAS Best Reviewer Award.  Her research spans the fields of machine learning and robotics with a particular emphasis on fast and reactive control and on human-robot interaction. This research received best paper awards from IEEE T-RO, RSS, ICRA, IROS, Humanoids and ROMAN and was featured in premier venues (BBC, IEEE Spectrum, Wired).

Maja J Matarić

University of Southern California

Los Angeles, California, USA

Abstract:

As robots become part of our world, we demand that they understand us, predict our needs and wants, and adapt to us as we change our moods and minds, learn, grow, and age. The nexus created by major improvements in machine learning for machine perception, navigation, and natural language processing has enabled human-robot interaction in real-world contexts, just as the need for human services continues to grow, from elder care to nursing to education and training, positively impacting user health and quality of life. We will discuss work that brings robotics together with machine learning for user modeling, signal processing, and affective computing in order to enable robots to understand, interact, and adapt to users’ ever-changing needs.  The talk will cover methods and challenges of using multi-modal interaction data and expressive agent behavior to monitor, coach, motivate, and support a wide variety of user populations and use cases.  We will cover insights from work with users across the age span (children, adults, elderly), ability span (typically developing, autism, stroke, Alzheimer’s), contexts (schools, therapy centers, homes), and deployment durations (up to 6 months), as well as commercial implications.

Bio:

Maja J Matarić is Chan Soon-Shiong Distinguished Professor of Computer Science, Neuroscience, and Pediatrics at the University of Southern California (USC) and the founding director of the USC Robotics and Autonomous Systems Center.  Her PhD and MS are from MIT, and her BS is from Kansas University.  She is Fellow of AAAS, IEEE, AAAI, and ACM, recipient of the US Presidential Award for Excellence in Science, Mathematics & Engineering Mentoring, Anita Borg Institute Women of Vision for Innovation, NSF Career, MIT TR35 Innovation, and IEEE RAS Early Career Awards, and authored “The Robotics Primer” (MIT Press).  Her university leadership includes serving as the Vice President of Research (2020-21) and as Engineering Vice Dean of Research (2006-2019).  She leads the Engineering K-12 STEM Center and actively mentors and empowers students, women, and other underrepresented groups toward pursuing STEM careers. A pioneer of the field of socially assistive robotics, her research is developing human-machine interaction for personalized support in convalescence, rehabilitation, training, and education for autism spectrum disorders, stroke, dementia, anxiety, and other major health and wellness challenges.

Aude G. Billard

Head of the LASA laboratory

Swiss Institute of Technology Lausanne (EPFL), Switzerland

Bio:

Aude Billard is full professor and head of the LASA laboratory at the School of Engineering at the Swiss Institute of Technology Lausanne (EPFL), and the Director of the Swiss National Theme Innovation Booster Network in Robotics.  She has been elected President of the IEEE Robotics and Automation Society, after serving in several roles in the administrative and executive committees of the society.  Dr. Billard holds a B.Sc and M.Sc. in Physics from EPFL (1995) and a Ph.D. in Artificial Intelligence (1998) from the University of Edinburgh.  Dr. Billard is an IEEE Fellow and was the recipient of the Intel Corporation Teaching award, the Swiss National Science Foundation career award, the Outstanding Young Person in Science and Innovation from the Swiss Chamber of Commerce, the IEEE RAS Distinguished Award and the IEEE-RAS Best Reviewer Award.  Her research spans the fields of machine learning and robotics with a particular emphasis on fast and reactive control and on human-robot interaction. This research received best paper awards from IEEE T-RO, RSS, ICRA, IROS, Humanoids and ROMAN and was featured in premier venues (BBC, IEEE Spectrum, Wired).

Session 3: Women in Robotics Engineering and Science

14:45-15:30 (45 minutes)

Session Chairs: Fumio Harashima and Toshio Fukuda

Fumio Harashima

Bio:

Fumio Harashima earned the bachelor’s, master’s, and doctoral degrees in Electrical Engineering from the University of Tokyo in 1962, 1964, and 1967, respectively.  After earning his Ph.D. degree, Dr. Harashima was hired as a professor at the University of Tokyo, Institute of Industrial Science.  In 1992-1995, Professor Harashima served as Director of the Institute.  Later Professor Harashima became President of the Tokyo Metropolitan Institute of Technology in 1998.  Professor Harashima was also President of the Tokyo Denki University from 2004 to 2008.  In 2009, Professor Harashima left the Tokyo Denki University and joined the Tokyo Metropolitan University as President and retired in March 2015.  Professor Harashima’s research focuses on Mechatronics and Power Electronics, which is an interdisciplinary area that requires not only technical knowledge but also an understanding of psychology and social science.  To that end, Professor Harashima has encouraged young engineers to have as broad academic background as possible, and never to stop pursuing their dreams.

Toshio Fukuda

Bio:

Toshio Fukuda received Dr. Eng. from the University of Tokyo, Tokyo, Japan, in 1977. Currently, He is Professor Emeritus Nagoya University, Professor Waseda University, His major is bio-robotics, especially Micro and Nano Robotics. Dr. Fukuda is IEEE President (2020), the IEEE Director of Division X, Systems and Control (2017-2018), IEEE Region 10 Director (2013-2014) and served President of IEEE Robotics and Automation Society (1998-1999), Director of the IEEE Division X, Systems and Control (2001- 2002), Co-founding Editor-in-Chief of IEEE / ASME Transactions on Mechatronics (2000-2002) and Editor-in-Chief of ROBOMECH Journal, Springer (2013-). He was Founding President of IEEE Nanotechnology Council (2002-2003, 2005).He was elected as a member of Science Council of Japan (2008-2013). IEEE Robotics and Automation Pioneer Award (2004), IEEE Robotics and Automation Technical Field Award (2010), Chunichi Culture Award(2019). IEEE Fellow (1995), SICE Fellow (1995), JSME Fellow (2001), RSJ Fellow (2004), Honorary Doctor of Aalto University School of Science and Technology (2010), Member of the Japan Academy of Engineering(2013), Medal of Honor on Purple Ribbon (2015), The Order of the Sacred Treasure, Gold Rays with Neck Ribbon (2022).

Fumio Harashima

Bio:

Fumio Harashima earned the bachelor’s, master’s, and doctoral degrees in Electrical Engineering from the University of Tokyo in 1962, 1964, and 1967, respectively.  After earning his Ph.D. degree, Dr. Harashima was hired as a professor at the University of Tokyo, Institute of Industrial Science.  In 1992-1995, Professor Harashima served as Director of the Institute.  Later Professor Harashima became President of the Tokyo Metropolitan Institute of Technology in 1998.  Professor Harashima was also President of the Tokyo Denki University from 2004 to 2008.  In 2009, Professor Harashima left the Tokyo Denki University and joined the Tokyo Metropolitan University as President and retired in March 2015.  Professor Harashima’s research focuses on Mechatronics and Power Electronics, which is an interdisciplinary area that requires not only technical knowledge but also an understanding of psychology and social science.  To that end, Professor Harashima has encouraged young engineers to have as broad academic background as possible, and never to stop pursuing their dreams.

Toshio Fukuda

Bio:

Toshio Fukuda received Dr. Eng. from the University of Tokyo, Tokyo, Japan, in 1977. Currently, He is Professor Emeritus Nagoya University, Professor Waseda University, His major is bio-robotics, especially Micro and Nano Robotics. Dr. Fukuda is IEEE President (2020), the IEEE Director of Division X, Systems and Control (2017-2018), IEEE Region 10 Director (2013-2014) and served President of IEEE Robotics and Automation Society (1998-1999), Director of the IEEE Division X, Systems and Control (2001- 2002), Co-founding Editor-in-Chief of IEEE / ASME Transactions on Mechatronics (2000-2002) and Editor-in-Chief of ROBOMECH Journal, Springer (2013-). He was Founding President of IEEE Nanotechnology Council (2002-2003, 2005).He was elected as a member of Science Council of Japan (2008-2013). IEEE Robotics and Automation Pioneer Award (2004), IEEE Robotics and Automation Technical Field Award (2010), Chunichi Culture Award(2019). IEEE Fellow (1995), SICE Fellow (1995), JSME Fellow (2001), RSJ Fellow (2004), Honorary Doctor of Aalto University School of Science and Technology (2010), Member of the Japan Academy of Engineering(2013), Medal of Honor on Purple Ribbon (2015), The Order of the Sacred Treasure, Gold Rays with Neck Ribbon (2022).

Women in Robotics Engineering and Science (WiRES) Session

(listed in alphabetical order)

Nancy Amato

Ruzena Bajcsy

Aude G. Billard

Cynthia Breazeal

Alicia Casals

Elizabeth Croft

Kerstin Dautenhahn

Maria Gini

Yi Guo

Kanako Harada

Jessica Hodgins

Ayanna Howard

M. Ani Hsieh

Leslie Pack Kaelbling

Lydia Kavraki

Danica Kragic

Hadas Kress-Gazit

Katherine Kuchenbecke

Dana Kulić

Cecilia Laschi

Maja Matarić

Yoky Matsuoka

Robin Murphy

Yukie Nagai

Marcia O’Malley

Allison Okamura

Ana Paiva

Lynne Parker

Hong Qiao

Daniela Rus

Andrea Thomaz

Manuela Veloso

Gentiane VENTURE

Jing Xiao

Holly Yanco

Session 4: Robot Research and Development (Plenary Session)

16:00-17:30 (90 minutes with Q&A included)

Speakers: Shigeo Hirose and Marc Raibert
Session Chair: Shugen Ma

Tips to Create Robots that Contribute to Society and Science

Shigeo Hirose

Professor Emeritus of Tokyo Institute of Technology
Director of the Hyper-Environmental Robots (HERO) Laboratory

Abstract:

I am currently working in the HERO (Hyper-Environmental Robots Lab) to develop robots that can perform various tasks in nuclear power plants and decommissioning operations.  In the development of robots for decommissioning work, it is necessary to create a novel robotic mechanism that no one in the world has ever seen before.

In this presentation, we will discuss how to proceed with the development. The flow can be summarized in the following five steps.

  1. Clarify objectives and constraints.
  2. Propose solutions utilizing all physical phenomena.
  3. Immediately prototype and clarify feasibility.
  4. Evaluate in light of the original purpose, proceed with simplification by integrating multiple functions, and make another prototype.
  5. If necessary, repeat the above steps with a determination to make bold changes to the design.

In addition, we will show through several examples that such practical robot development promotes unexpected discoveries in the manner of “Analysis by Synthesis,” and argue that such discoveries are the way for contributing to Robotics science.

Bio:

Shigeo Hirose is Professor Emeritus of Tokyo Institute of Technology and Director of the Hyper-Environmental Robots (HERO) Laboratory. After receiving PhD degree of Control Engineering from Tokyo Institute of Technology in 1976, he has been assistant professor, associate professor, professor, distinguished professor and director of SMS development & innovation center.  In HERO Lab., he is now developing many types of hyper-environmental robots including decommissioning robots for the Fukushima-Daiichi Nuclear Reactor.  He received nearly 80 awards, including Order of the Sacred Treasure from Japanese government (2021), IEEE Most Influential Paper Award (2018), Top 10 Most Cited Papers Award, Mechanism and Machine Theory (2017), IEEE Inaba Technical Award for Innovation Leading to Production (2017), IEEE Robotics and Automation Award (2014), Joseph Engelberger Robotics Award (2009), Medal with Purple Ribbon from Japanese government (2006), Award of Merits from IFToMM (2004), IEEE Pioneer in Robotics & Automation Award (1999).  He has published more than 1000 academic papers and books, including “Biologically Inspired Robots” (Oxford University Press, 1993).

Shigeo Hirose

Professor Emeritus of Tokyo Institute of Technology
Director of the Hyper-Environmental Robots (HERO) Laboratory

Abstract:

I am currently working in the HERO (Hyper-Environmental Robots Lab) to develop robots that can perform various tasks in nuclear power plants and decommissioning operations.  In the development of robots for decommissioning work, it is necessary to create a novel robotic mechanism that no one in the world has ever seen before.

In this presentation, we will discuss how to proceed with the development. The flow can be summarized in the following five steps.

  1. Clarify objectives and constraints.
  2. Propose solutions utilizing all physical phenomena.
  3. Immediately prototype and clarify feasibility.
  4. Evaluate in light of the original purpose, proceed with simplification by integrating multiple functions, and make another prototype.
  5. If necessary, repeat the above steps with a determination to make bold changes to the design.

In addition, we will show through several examples that such practical robot development promotes unexpected discoveries in the manner of “Analysis by Synthesis,” and argue that such discoveries are the way for contributing to Robotics science.

Bio:

Shigeo Hirose is Professor Emeritus of Tokyo Institute of Technology and Director of the Hyper-Environmental Robots (HERO) Laboratory. After receiving PhD degree of Control Engineering from Tokyo Institute of Technology in 1976, he has been assistant professor, associate professor, professor, distinguished professor and director of SMS development & innovation center.  In HERO Lab., he is now developing many types of hyper-environmental robots including decommissioning robots for the Fukushima-Daiichi Nuclear Reactor.  He received nearly 80 awards, including Order of the Sacred Treasure from Japanese government (2021), IEEE Most Influential Paper Award (2018), Top 10 Most Cited Papers Award, Mechanism and Machine Theory (2017), IEEE Inaba Technical Award for Innovation Leading to Production (2017), IEEE Robotics and Automation Award (2014), Joseph Engelberger Robotics Award (2009), Medal with Purple Ribbon from Japanese government (2006), Award of Merits from IFToMM (2004), IEEE Pioneer in Robotics & Automation Award (1999).  He has published more than 1000 academic papers and books, including “Biologically Inspired Robots” (Oxford University Press, 1993).

A Culture of Robotics Research

A Culture of Robotics Research

Marc Raibert

Chairman of Boston Dynamics

Abstract:

Doing research on physical robots is one of the most satisfying careers an engineer can have. In this talk I will discuss several elements of robotics research culture that contribute to progress and satisfaction:

  • Steppingstones to Moonshots
  • Build it, Break it, Fix it
  • Ambitious, Diligent and Intrepid
  • Technical Fearlessness
  • Have fun.

Bio:

Marc Raibert is Founder and Chairman of Boston Dynamics, a company that creates some of the world’s most advanced robots, such as Atlas, Spot and Stretch. A key ingredient of these robots is their dynamic behavior, which contributes to their effectiveness and versatility in the real world. Before starting Boston Dynamics, Raibert was Professor of Computer Science and Robotics at MIT and at Carnegie Mellon University. While there, he founded the Leg Laboratory, a research lab that helped establish the scientific basis for highly dynamic robots. These robots were inspired by the remarkable ability of animals to move with agility, dexterity, perception and intelligence, and set the stage for the robots developed at Boston Dynamics. Raibert is a Founding Fellow of the Association for the Advancement of AI, was inducted into the National Academy of Engineering in 2008, was named Pioneer in Robotics by IEEE and received the Engelberger Award in Technology in 2022. Even better, two of Raibert’s robots were inducted into the Robot Hall of Fame in 2008 and 2012.

A Culture of Robotics Research

Marc Raibert

Chairman of Boston Dynamics

Abstract:

Doing research on physical robots is one of the most satisfying careers an engineer can have. In this talk I will discuss several elements of robotics research culture that contribute to progress and satisfaction:

  • Steppingstones to Moonshots
  • Build it, Break it, Fix it
  • Ambitious, Diligent and Intrepid
  • Technical Fearlessness
  • Have fun.

Bio:

Marc Raibert is Founder and Chairman of Boston Dynamics, a company that creates some of the world’s most advanced robots, such as Atlas, Spot and Stretch. A key ingredient of these robots is their dynamic behavior, which contributes to their effectiveness and versatility in the real world. Before starting Boston Dynamics, Raibert was Professor of Computer Science and Robotics at MIT and at Carnegie Mellon University. While there, he founded the Leg Laboratory, a research lab that helped establish the scientific basis for highly dynamic robots. These robots were inspired by the remarkable ability of animals to move with agility, dexterity, perception and intelligence, and set the stage for the robots developed at Boston Dynamics. Raibert is a Founding Fellow of the Association for the Advancement of AI, was inducted into the National Academy of Engineering in 2008, was named Pioneer in Robotics by IEEE and received the Engelberger Award in Technology in 2022. Even better, two of Raibert’s robots were inducted into the Robot Hall of Fame in 2008 and 2012.